Greg Michael Delgoffe, PhD: The Problem with Chemo, Radiation and Surgery

Years Funded: 2017-2019

Metabolic Reprogramming of Tumor-Specific T Cells for Immunotherapy
At the University of Pittsburgh Department of Immunology (Pittsburgh, PA), Greg Michael Delgoffe, PhD, and his team are metabolically reprogramming T cells to make them more robust and fit to fight cancer for longer periods of time.

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Marco Gallo, PhD: Drilling Down into the DNA

Years Funded: 2017-2019

3D Genome Engineering to Target Brain Tumor Stem Cells
At the University of Calgary Cumming School of Medicine (Calgary, AB Canada), a research team led by Marco Gallo, PhD, used cutting edge technology to unravel the specific DNA architecture of GBM cancer stem cells and identify potential new treatment approaches.

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Yvonne Chen, PhD: Building Better CARs

Years Funded: 2016-2019

High-Throughput Screening of High-Performance Chimeric Antigen Receptors
Yvonne Chen, PhD, of the Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Molecular Genetics, and the Department of Chemical Biomolecular Engineering at the University of California, Los Angeles, organized an ambitious high-throughput screening (HTS) initiative to identify high-performing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) from thousands of CAR variants. After shifting her research methodology to testing constructs in animal models, three structural parameters were determined to have the most impact on CAR design plus a promising new CAR targeting a B-cell lymphoma antigen (CD20) emerged.

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Crystal Mackall, MD: Unleashing the Hounds

Years Funded: 2016-2019

GD2 Chimeric Antigen Receptor Therapy for Osteosarcoma
A new iteration of CAR T-cell therapy developed by Crystal Mackall, MD, at Stanford University (Stanford, CA), successfully prepares T cells to seek and destroy solid tumors that express the fatty sugar biomarker GD2. Sensitivity to the GD2 biomarker directs T cells to target solid tumors, such as neuroblastoma, osteosarcoma and diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DPIG), in much the same way that T cells are engineered to seek and destroy cancers that express the protein biomarker CD19.

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Brent Hanks, MD, PhD: Feeling optimistic

Years Funded: 2016-2019

Metabolic Reprogramming of Dendritic Cell-Based Cancer Vaccines
At Duke University School of Medicine (Durham, NC), tumor immunologist Brent Hanks, MD, PhD, is pioneering a new strategy to engineer dendritic cells to successfully resist cancer’s efforts to stop them from triggering a body’s own anti-cancer immune response.

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